The time is always right to encourage someone and to let someone know you care. On Friday, Feb. 14, 2020, we celebrate Valentine’s Day. It is a day when florists are busy, cards go out through the mail to friends and loved ones, children at school exchange Valentine’s and get good and “sugared up” before going home to their parents, and boxes of chocolate and sweets are given: “Sweets for the sweet.” I love Valentine’s Day, because I love that it’s about love, and many folks need to hear those words “I love you,” and they need to hear them from you. Don’t be stingy with those words. It’s better to say them NOW than to wish you had said them LATER; when it’s too late.

Maybe, just maybe in the halls of government, and at its most rarified levels, all folks of all political parties should spend a little while reflecting on what might be learned from the simplest of children’s rhymes and songs. Perhaps during this time of the year when we celebrate a lot of history and lot of love, we should consider that opportunities for learning often come from places and individuals we might overlook.

Since most of my life has been spent in the wonderful company of young children, I thought I would bring a few reminders to us in this article. Maybe some of these will make you smile. Maybe some will make you think. Maybe they will make you smile and think and to consider that we are all in this “boat together.”

In fact, I will begin with the lyrics of a simple song “Row, row, row, your boat, gently down the stream. Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream.”

“The more we get together, together, together. The more we get together, the happier we’ll be. For your friends are my friends, and my friends are your friends. The more we get together, the happier we’ll be.”

“Good morning to you! Good morning to you! We’re all in our places with sunshine on faces, and this is the way to start a new day. Good morning to you! Good morning to you! Whatever the weather, we’ll make it together, and this is the way to start a new day.”

“Jesus loves the little children. All the children of the world. Red and yellow black and white. They are precious in His sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.”

“He’s got the whole world in His hands. He’s got the whole world in His hands. He’s got the whole world in His hands. He’s got the whole world in His hands. He’s got the wind and the rain. In His hands. He’s got the wind and rain, in His Hands. He’s got the wind and the rain in His hands. He’s got the whole world in His hands. He’s got you and me brother in His hands. He’s got you and me sister in His hands. He’s got you and me brother in His hands. He’s got the whole world in His hands.”

“Praise Him! Praise Him. All ye little children. God is love. God is love. Praise Him. Praise Him! All ye little children! God is love. God is love.”

“It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood
a beautiful day for a neighbor
Could you be mine?
Would you be mine?

“It's a neighborly day in this beauty wood
a neighborly day for a beauty
Could you be mine?
Would you be mine?

“I have always wanted to have a neighbor just like you
I've always wanted to live in a neighborhood with you

“Let's make the most of this beautiful day
Since we're together, might as well say
Would you be my, could you be my
Won't you be my neighbor?”

— From Mr. Rodgers Neighborhood

“Sunny day 
Sweepin' the clouds away 
On my way to where the air is sweet

Can you tell me how to get, 
How to get to Sesame Street?

Come and play 
Everything's A-OK 
Friendly neighbors there 
That's where we meet

Can you tell me how to get 
How to get to Sesame Street.”

— Sesame Street theme song

This article may seem a bit childish to some of you, but, maybe, if you give yourself time to think about it, you may realize that there is real truth, real beauty, and lessons worth learning from childish simplicity. One of my favorite verses from the Bible contains three words: “God is love.” (I John, Chapter 4, verse 8),

Lessons from childhood. Pretty great stuff when you and consider them. There’s a reason they refer to many of the little verses from childhood as “classics.”

To bring a close to this week’s article, hearkening back to childhood and the first grade class of the late Miss Virginia Bell at, then, White Springs High School, later South Hamilton Elementary, we ended each school day by singing:

“Now the day is over, and we are going home. Good-bye. Good-bye. Be always kind and good.”

From the Eight Mile Still on the Woodpecker Route north of White Springs, wishing you a Happy Valentine’s Day, and I wish you a day filled with joy, peace, and, above all, lots of love and laughter.

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